Feed aggregator

Lesser Prairie-Chicken De-listed

MuirNet - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 09:25
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Removes Lesser Prairie-Chicken from List of Threatened and Endangered Species in Accordance with Court Order; Agency will continue working with stakeholders on conservation efforts benefitting lesser prairie-chicken, landowners and local economies

July 19, 2016 - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today fulfilled a court ruling that had vacated its Endangered Species Act (ESA) listing decision, by officially removing the lesser prairie-chicken from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife.

This administrative action and the decision not to appeal the court’s ruling do not constitute a biological determination on whether or not the lesser prairie-chicken warrants federal protection. The Service is undertaking a thorough re-evaluation of the bird’s status and the threats it faces using the best available scientific information to determine anew whether listing under the ESA is warranted.

Read More ...

Categories: Legislation

Mechanical Sympathy and Damage Mitigation

4x4 Wire - Sat, 07/16/2016 - 13:47

I vividly recall a beautiful morning in the sand dunes drinking my first cup of coffee while watching the sun poke its nose over the bank of clouds behind a 60 foot dune. An early four-wheeler was testing his new injection system nearby. As he went up a razorback, I could tell he had too much throttle. As he cleared the top, a trail of sand followed the jeep a good six feet above the crest. As razorbacks have a habit of doing, the drop off on the other side proved more extreme than the Jeeper expected. The resulting endo was disastrous for his weekend. Luckily, he walked away but the Jeep was another matter. 

Categories: Legislation

Mechanical Sympathy / Damage Mitigation

Badlands Off Road Adventures - Fri, 07/15/2016 - 00:00
Mechanical Sympathy / Damage Mitigation
(Click picture for a larger image.) I vividly recall a beautiful morning in the sand dunes drinking my first cup of coffee while watching the sun poke its nose over the bank of clouds behind a 60 foot dune. An early four-wheeler was testing his new injection system nearby. As he went up a razorback, I could tell he had too much throttle. As he cleared the top, a trail of sand followed the jeep a good six feet above the crest. As razorbacks have a habit of doing, the drop off on the other side proved more extreme than the Jeeper expected. The resulting endo was disastrous for his weekend. Luckily, he walked away but the Jeep was another matter.

It goes without saying that a reliable vehicle is a must for four wheeling. Without a dependable 4WD vehicle, we literally could not participate in this exciting hobby. That dependability is affected by how well we maintain our vehicles and how we treat them off road.

Which brings me to “mechanical sympathy.” I know it sounds strange. After all, do you really have sympathy for your 4WD vehicle? You probably do, but just don’t call it that. Mechanical sympathy involves taking care of your vehicle and driving properly to mitigation possible damage so that the vehicle gets you back home.

Mechanical sympathy entails several facets. Here are the more important ones.

- Avoid reckless driving. Testosterone poisoning can be a big problem among four wheelers. When affected by this disease, we feel we need to prove ourselves by using excessive momentum to overcome lack of tractions, going air borne for the record, and trying highly risky obstacles. In addition to putting people at risk, that behavior is tough on vehicles (and the environment). The only thing to “prove” while off road is your ability to be a good ambassador for four wheeling. Save the hot dogging for the Xbox game back home.

- Be aware of the environment. Note the terrain around and below your vehicle. Listen for anything unusual. A slow pace allows you to properly place your tires (though a spotter is useful in some situations). You also have time to respond to changes in the environment. Roll down the windows, turn the radio off, turn the air conditioner off, and listen carefully. Your vehicle tells you a lot about how it feels and a good deal about the terrain.

With the windows down, I know immediately when there’s a new sound coming from the vehicle. Not every sound is a cause for concern. Some scraping under the vehicle is ok and won’t cause damage. If you hear scraping and feel resistance, however, stop, back out and recon before trying again – perhaps a few inches over.

- Maintain proper speed. Some four wheelers think that if a little bit of momentum is good, a lot more must be better. That’s simply not true. We want to drive as slowly as possible…the old adage is, “As slowly as possible but as fast as necessary.” Too much momentum—read that as “speed”—can be dangerous. It’s too easy to lose control. The terrain takes over control. It can flip you up a bank or off the deep end of a shelf road. High speed on bumpy terrain is tough on your vehicle, too.

- Keep up with maintenance. A properly maintained vehicle is less likely to break down—on the road or on the trails. Refer to your owner’s manual for regularly scheduled maintenance. “An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure,” as the old saying goes. Regular maintenance can mean the difference between a vehicle that survives the trails and one that doesn’t.

- Perform a full inspection of your vehicle. Before starting and after lunch are good times for a 360-degree inspection. (And, of course, before you get back on the highway.) Even after numerous trips with no issues, don’t stop the inspection regimen. Parts can break at any time. Plus, you become so familiar with your vehicle; it’s much easier to recognize a problem. A new sound or symptom is readily apparent because it is so unusual.

I recommend a complete inspection before every 4WD excursion. But inspections are crucial while four wheeling, as well. Look for drips or puddles, stuff hanging down, loose nuts and bolts and anything else out of place. Inspect the engine compartment, too. Anything out of place is really noticeable. Which is another reason to keep the engine bay clean.

“Mechanical sympathy” is a fancy term for a basic but important concept. Just as you (I hope!) take good care of your health, so should you take good care of your vehicle. Regular maintenance and sound driving habits will keep your vehicle at peak performance. And ensure that it’s ready to take you on those thrilling 4WD excursions. # # #
Related Articles from Badlands Off-road Adventures Did you miss the previous article? Some Upcoming Events

(click on the link for details)

Badlands Off-Road Adventures on Bull Frog Trail in Johnson Valley
Photo by The Adventure Portal
(Click picture for a larger image.) With just over a month before the Rubicon Trail trip, now is the time to sign up and make the commitment that this is the year you will "do the Con". You just have time to, schedule vacation, make those upgrades you need, and prepare for an epic trip. Check the schedule below to sign up for the Rubicon.

Summary of upcoming events. Rubicon Trail Adventure August 15- 18, 2016

The Rubicon Trail is the stuff of legends. It is considered the Grand Daddy of trails. If your vehicle has a weakness, it will find it. Any serious four-wheeler needs to "Do the 'Con" at least once. There is no guarantee of avoiding vehicle damage. Even the most skilled driver can succumb to the fatigue of 12 unrelenting miles of rocks. Just bring a good attitude and the best prepared vehicle you can. This could be a once in a lifetime trip but a lifelong of bragging rights. More Details


You need to register now so you have time to prepare. Register directly at http://4x4training.com/calendar/calendar.php#Rubicon



Sand Clinic August 27, 2016
On Pismo Beach in California
Photo by Facebook Lisa
(Click picture for a larger image.) If you have been waiting for the next Sand Driving Clinic, put it on your calendar for August 27th and sign up now. This day-long clinic will expose you to a variety of driving conditions and levels of difficulty. Driving on sand is challenging and different than dirt, so we’ll progress slowly as you learn the proper techniques. As your confidence grows, you will master increasingly more challenging dunes. Along the way you will be exposed to the beauty of SVRA and the thrill of the windswept dunes. This is a rare opportunity to cruise the only beach in California open to vehicles.
More details...



Register for the Sand Clinic using this link.

http://4x4training.com/calendar/calendar.php#SandPismo



May 5, 2016 - ALL COLORS BACK in STOCK
Click for higher resolution image We now have all six colors of our winch bandana back in stock!

The Orange and Red went fast last time with blue not far behind so if you want a specific color order now while we have them all available.

The Bandana layout follows the “Vehicle Recovery Plan” with pathways to more detail. A unique section of the Bandana, gives the steps for a “Winch Rigging Check: Walk through” so that you verify every element of the rigging before you commit to the pull.

Stuff this in your recovery kit and you will always be ready.

Warning – the Bandana is not a substitute for proper training and use of quality equipment used within the bounds of their safe working load. We advise you to use the information provided in the Winching Recovery Bandana at your own risk. We cannot control the quality and specifications of the equipment used and the methods actually employed.

The original press release with larger graphics is on the website It comes in many colors.
(Click picture for a larger image.) Jack Covers Have you ever broken a tire bead while 4- wheeling and found that the hi-lift jack was barely operational due to dust, dirt and mud packed into the operating mechanism? Not only is it frustrating but dangerous as well. Since most of us bolt our hi-lift on the outside of the vehicle, it is not uncommon to find the mechanism less than functional.

A simple boot over the working parts of the jack to protect it and keep it clean is an idea that has been around for a while. The current offerings have not been very successful. At TDS this week, I discovered a new product for the hi-lift jack cover that looks promising.

Adam Woods has built a better “mouse trap” which he market under the name www.jackcovers.com The new cover marries a neoprene inner liner with a marine grade vinyl shell on the outside. It has a heavy duty - #10 Marine grade zipper, treated for mildew and antimicrobial, and available in 20 + colors. Since the product covers a number of holes on the jack upright, Adam explained to me he analyzed which holes most of us use to mount a hi-lift and offers two sizes of the cover - 11" and 15”- to allow several mounting combinations.

73
KI6FHA
I hope to see you on the trails!
Tom Severin, President
Badlands Off Road Adventures, Inc.
4-Wheel Drive School
310-613-5473
http://www.4x4training.com
Make it Fun. Keep it Safe.
#####
If you find this information valuable, please pass it on to a friend. You can forward them the email. If you received a forwarded copy of this newsletter and would like to subscribe for yourself, go to: www.4x4training.com/contacts.html and follow the instructions to join our mail list.
Want To Use This Article In Your Magazine, E-Zine, Club Newsletter Or Web Site? You are welcome to use it anytime, just be sure to include the following author/copyright information: Tom Severin, 4x4 Coach, teaches 4WD owners how to confidently and safely use their vehicles to the fullest extent in difficult terrain and adverse driving conditions. Visit www.4x4training.com to develop or improve your driving skill.

Copyright 2016, Badlands Off-Road Adventures, Inc.

USDA and DoD Battle to conserve

MuirNet - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 15:20
Interior, Agriculture & Defense Team Up To Conserve Landscapes and Wildlife, Bolster Rural Economies, and Ensure Military Readiness

WASHINGTON – The Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Defense joined with state and federal partners today to announce the designation of three new Sentinel Landscapes to benefit working lands, wildlife conservation and military readiness. Through the Sentinel Landscapes partnership, the DOI, USDA and DoD have committed to working together in overlapping priority areas near military installations to help farmers and ranchers make improvements to the land that benefit their operation, enhance wildlife habitat, and enable DoD's training missions to continue. This year’s Sentinel Landscapes were chosen for Avon Park Air Force Range in Florida, Camp Ripley in Minnesota and military bases in Eastern North Carolina.

Read More ...

Categories: Legislation

Members Call on BLM to Go Back to the Drawing Board

MuirNet - Sun, 07/10/2016 - 14:16
BLM's Planning 2.0 Rule Crowds Out Local, State Voices in Favor of Special Interests

Washington, D.C. – Today, the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations held an oversight hearing to hear from state and local representatives on the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) draft Planning 2.0 Rule. This draft rule would dramatically shift resource management planning away from local communities to bureaucrats in Washington, D.C.

Read More ...

Categories: Legislation

Q & A on the Impacts of SB 1235, the Ammo Registration Bill

4x4 Wire - Sun, 07/10/2016 - 13:23

The California State Assembly and Senate recently passed, and Governor Brown signed, several bills implementing controls on guns and ammo purchases.  SB 1235, the ammo regulation bill that was signed into law.

While some of the details of SB 1235 implementation are still unclear and may need to be further worked out by the Department of Justice or subsequent legislation, the California Waterfowl Association has received some information from legislative staff on details of the bill.

Categories: Legislation

On the go power

4x4 Wire - Thu, 06/30/2016 - 16:42

UPS stopped by today with a package.  While it wasn’t a load of fireworks, it was a compact lithium-ion battery charger, not the traditional jump starter booster pack. Filled with connections, it provide portable 12-volts, USB port for mobile devices, a 500 lumen LED flashlight and up to 80 jump starts on a single charge.  The jump charge includes up to 10.0 liter gas or diesel engine.

Categories: Legislation

WSGS Publishes Comprehensive Report on Rare Earth Elements in Wyoming

MuirNet - Thu, 06/30/2016 - 15:30

Rare Earth Elements (REE) are a vital resource to industrialized societies and necessary for energy generation, transportation, data transmission and national defense. They are encompassed in everyday life whether in cell phones or energy provided by wind turbines. A report recently published by the Wyoming Sate Geological Survey (WSGS) examined REE occurrences within Wyoming.
 
“This report provides key information for individuals and companies interested in locating, evaluating and pursuing the potential commercial development of mineral resources that are critical to the progression of current and future high-tech industries,” says Tom Drean, director of the WSGS. “There is little doubt that REE will play a key role as new innovations and associated products are developed.”
 
The REE group is composed of 17 metallic elements. REE occurrences have been documented across Wyoming since the 1930s, but early exploration primarily focused on uranium and thorium, and REE were only an interesting association. Early investigations identified many sites that either hosted REE or were later interpreted to be potential REE occurrences. The studies, however, lacked complete elemental analyses.

Read More ...

Categories: Legislation

Wildfire, recreational safety: Everyone’s responsibility this holiday weekend

4x4 Wire - Wed, 06/29/2016 - 15:32

Kaibab National Forest officials are expecting increased numbers of visitors at the forest’s more popular recreational areas over the Fourth of July weekend. Visitors are encouraged to use caution during all recreational activities that could potentially cause personal injury or a wildfire. The following are tips for having a safe and pleasant visit to the Kaibab National Forest: 

Campfires, Smoking and Fireworks: Forest visitors are reminded that although some areas of the forest have received some isolated moisture, the forest remains in very high fire danger and campfire and smoking restrictions are in effect in order to protect public health and reduce preventable human-caused fires.

Categories: Legislation

10 tips for safe, responsible OHV riding during July 4th weekend

4x4 Wire - Wed, 06/29/2016 - 13:56
AZGFD encourages off-highway vehicle operators, passengers to ride safely

With the Fourth of July weekend upon us, many Arizona residents and visitors are planning to hop on their off highway vehicle (OHV). Before hitting the trail, the Arizona Game and Fish Department reminds operators and passengers to do so safely and responsibly by following these 10 tips:

  1. Always wear a helmet. Whether riding in a side-by-side, all-terrain vehicle (ATV) or dirt bike, helmets are strongly recommended for all riders. However, those who are younger than18 years old are legally required to wear a Department of Transportation-approved helmet.
Categories: Legislation

Forest Service Makes it Easier for Visitors to Enjoy National Forests and Grasslands

4x4 Wire - Tue, 06/28/2016 - 16:14
Announces Steps to Modernize Recreation Permitting Process

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell today announced steps to make it easier for outfitters, guides, schools, non-profits and other partners to take groups out to enjoy outdoor activities on national forests and grasslands. By streamlining the approach to special-use permitting for national forests and grasslands, our natural resources will be even more accessible to Americans.

Categories: Legislation

Forest Service Survey Finds Record 66 Million Dead Trees in Southern Sierra Nevada

MuirNet - Tue, 06/28/2016 - 16:08

VALLEJO, CALIF., JUNE 22, 2016 AT 2:30 PM EDT -The U.S. Forest Service today announced that it has identified an additional 26 million trees dead in California since October 2015. These trees are located in six counties across 760,000 acres in the southern Sierra Nevada region of the state, and are in addition to the 40 million trees that died statewide from 2010 to October 2015, bringing the total to at least 66 million dead trees. Four consecutive years of severe drought in California, a dramatic rise in bark beetle infestation and warmer temperatures are leading to historic levels of tree die-off.

Read More ...

Categories: Legislation

BLM Brings Awareness to Human Caused Fires

4x4 Wire - Tue, 06/28/2016 - 15:52

Winnemucca, Nev. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Winnemucca District, would like to remind everyone that fire danger is on the rise as we enter summer. A fairly wet winter and early spring warming has contributed to higher fuel loadings of cheat grass for most areas within the Winnemucca District. At this time, fuel loadings are 43% above the historical average (from 1998-2015). 

Categories: Legislation

10 Duties of a 4WD Tail End

Badlands Off Road Adventures - Mon, 06/20/2016 - 00:00
10 Duties of a 4WD Tail End Alstrom Point - Lake Powell
(Click picture for a larger image.) A great Trail Leader is invaluable for any four wheeling experience. We reviewed that position in “10 Qualities of a Great Trail Leader” . Though he could be anywhere in the group, the Trail Leader is often in the first vehicle.

The vehicle at the end of the line is also very important. Sometimes called Tail End Charlie, The Sweep, Drag, or Caboose (although I don’t normally use any of those term), the Tail end is an integral part of every 4WD trip. Tail End Charlie is slang from World War II for the rear gunner in a bomber. Many of the expressions we use come from the military both for their ability to convey a thought concisely and the colorful expressions. A trail helper in the middle of the group is called a mid-gunner. Qualifications When selecting a Tail End, I start with someone well qualified in four wheeling. This person has driven with me before, knows the trail and routine well and has great people skills. In a nutshell, he or she is someone I can trust. The Tail End might be called upon to fill in for me at some point.

Ideally, the Tail End complements the Trail Leader by bringing skills in which the Leader is less knowledgable. These can include expert mechanical skills, knowledge of rocks and minerals, an ability to ID plants and flowers, and so forth.

It’s helpful if the person is a ham radio operator. FRS and CB radios are fine for communicating between vehicles. Because the vehicles can get strung out during a trip, it’s nice to be in ham radio contact with the Tail End. Plus, we can use that radio for private conversations. For example, the Tail End may wonder why we aren’t taking a particular route this time. Or, perhaps I forget a step. In either case, I don’t mind if my Tail End chimes in. He should use our private frequency so as not to confuse everyone else.

As for specific duties, the Tail End: 1. Informs the guide when the group has cleared key turns. Sometimes a driver misses a turn and strays off-course. The Trail Leader can only see a vehicle or two behind, whereas the Tail End has a much better perspective.

2. Accounts for all the vehicles when starting up again. This is after breaking camp or making any sort of pit stop (10-100, taking pictures, and such). Because he’s in the back—just sitting there—he can count everyone. Since we usually do a radio check only at the start of the trip (or day) to make sure all are working, the count process works well. Once in a while, we pick up a few strays!

3. As the last one out of camp, he can spot any major item overlooked like stuff left behind, a camp fire not satisfactorily extinguished, or some remaining trash.

4. Advises Trail Leader on issues the Leader isn’t aware of. Being at the rear, the Tail End has a better view of the entire group. (Although heavy dust cuts visibility at times.) The Tail End can advise of a need to stop or slow down due to large gaps in the group, cargo dropping off, mechanical problems or a manifold burrito in the middle of the road.

5. Helps with spotting. Being at the back of the line, the Tail End can quickly provide spotting to the vehicles in the rear. When everyone needs to be spotted, the Tail End can relieve the Trail Leader, so the Leader can pull his vehicle further up the trail to make room for the group. And heaven forbid, when the Trail Leader needs a qualified spotter, the Tail End can walk all the way up to the front and make sure the Trail Leader gets through without embarrassing himself.

6. Assists with vehicle issues. Perhaps some gear needs to be strapped down. Or a vehicle suffers a minor breakdown. If the damage is too severe (but the vehicle is drivable), the Tail End can escort that driver back to the road. If the Trail Leader elects to do that, the Tail End is often tapped to take over as Leader to complete the course.

7. Informs the group about vehicles overtaking them. Very valuable, because everyone else is focused on the trail ahead. If appropriate, the Tail End suggests how and where to pull over.

8. Thanks oncoming vehicles that stopped to let the group go by and let them know he is the last one. It’s a simple gesture, but means a lot to the other group. And the Tail End continues the longstanding tradition of gentlemanly behavior that is such an important part of four wheeling.

Speaking of saying “thanks,” remember to offer your gratitude to any landowners whose property you drive on. And, of course, take good care of their property.

9. Waits for late guests. Having a Tail End who knows the trail and the plan comes in handy when a guest is late. The Tail End can wait at the meeting point for the late guest. They will likely catchup at the air down spot. We discourage splitting up the group, unless absolutely necessary. The most common case is either a machine problem or the need for some vehicles to take a detour. In those cases, the Tail End provides guidance to one or the other group.

10. The End (just being).

Benefits of Being Tail End
  • You get to go on a trip!
  • Work does not involve sitting in a cubicle.
  • People think of you as a hero when you plug their tire.
  • You can take a 10-100 anytime you want and you don't have to walk too far.
  • You can blame the Trail Leader if the group is lost.
  • No one see you if you mess up.
  • You have a front row seat to everything that happens.
  • On the job training to become a Trail Leader.
  • You get to eat dust for the whole trip. Which means the Tequila will taste even better when the day's driving is done.
Even though the Tail End is the last vehicle in the group, it’s an extremely important position. This driver is often as skilled as the Trail Leader, and has the added responsibilities inherent in being placed last in line. But it’s a good role to aspire to. As you develop your 4WD skills and experience, plan for the day when you will step up and volunteer to be a Tail End. ##########################
Related Articles from Badlands Off-road Adventures Did you miss the previous article?

May 5, 2016 - ALL COLORS BACK in STOCK
Click for higher resolution image We now have all six colors of our winch bandana back in stock!

The Orange and Red went fast last time with blue not far behind so if you want a specific color order now while we have them all available.

The Bandana layout follows the “Vehicle Recovery Plan” with pathways to more detail. A unique section of the Bandana, gives the steps for a “Winch Rigging Check: Walk through” so that you verify every element of the rigging before you commit to the pull.

Stuff this in your recovery kit and you will always be ready.

Warning – the Bandana is not a substitute for proper training and use of quality equipment used within the bounds of their safe working load. We advise you to use the information provided in the Winching Recovery Bandana at your own risk. We cannot control the quality and specifications of the equipment used and the methods actually employed.

The original press release with larger graphics is on the website Some Upcoming Events

(click on the link for details)

Serpent Crossing the road - Borrego Springs, CA
(Click picture for a larger image.) With just over 2 months before the Rubicon Trail trip, now is the time to sign up and make the commitment that this is the year you will "do the Con". 3 months will give you time to, schedule vacation, make those upgrades you need, get in a Rocks Clinic or two and prepare for an epic trip. Check the schedule below to sign up for Rock clinics and the Rubicon.

Summary of upcoming events. ########################## Rock Clinic June 18 and July 09

Rocks

If you are planning on doing the Rubicon, this is a good "shake down" or if you prefer a "warm up" clinic. It is great introduction to rocks even if you don't plan to do the Rubicon. The Class will be in Johnson Valley. It is an introduction to Rock crawling but it is not on "baby" rocks. We take our time and stress careful wheel placement. We use spotters for difficult sections. You learn by inspecting the obstacle and predicting the line; by watching others try their line; by experiencing it yourself; and by the coaching. We recommend you repeat the training several times. You will be much more relaxed the second time over the same obstacles and you will pick up on little details missed the first time. More Details...


You can register directly at http://www.4x4training.com/calendar/calendar.php#Rocks


Rubicon Trail Adventure August 15- 18, 2016

The Rubicon Trail is the stuff of legends. It is considered the Grand Daddy of trails. If your vehicle has a weakness, it will find it. Any serious four-wheeler needs to "Do the 'Con" at least once. There is no guarantee of avoiding vehicle damage. Even the most skilled driver can succumb to the fatigue of 12 unrelenting miles of rocks. Just bring a good attitude and the best prepared vehicle you can. This could be a once in a lifetime trip but a lifelong of bragging rights. More Details


You need to register now so you have time to prepare. Register directly at http://4x4training.com/calendar/calendar.php#Rubicon


It comes in many colors.
(Click picture for a larger image.) Jack Covers Have you ever broken a tire bead while 4- wheeling and found that the hi-lift jack was barely operational due to dust, dirt and mud packed into the operating mechanism? Not only is it frustrating but dangerous as well. Since most of us bolt our hi-lift on the outside of the vehicle, it is not uncommon to find the mechanism less than functional.

A simple boot over the working parts of the jack to protect it and keep it clean is an idea that has been around for a while. The current offerings have not been very successful. At TDS this week, I discovered a new product for the hi-lift jack cover that looks promising.

Adam Woods has built a better “mouse trap” which he market under the name www.jackcovers.com The new cover marries a neoprene inner liner with a marine grade vinyl shell on the outside. It has a heavy duty - #10 Marine grade zipper, treated for mildew and antimicrobial, and available in 20 + colors. Since the product covers a number of holes on the jack upright, Adam explained to me he analyzed which holes most of us use to mount a hi-lift and offers two sizes of the cover - 11" and 15”- to allow several mounting combinations.

73
KI6FHA
I hope to see you on the trails!
Tom Severin, President
Badlands Off Road Adventures, Inc.
4-Wheel Drive School
310-613-5473
http://www.4x4training.com
Make it Fun. Keep it Safe.
#####
If you find this information valuable, please pass it on to a friend. You can forward them the email. If you received a forwarded copy of this newsletter and would like to subscribe for yourself, go to: www.4x4training.com/contacts.html and follow the instructions to join our mail list.
Want To Use This Article In Your Magazine, E-Zine, Club Newsletter Or Web Site? You are welcome to use it anytime, just be sure to include the following author/copyright information: Tom Severin, 4x4 Coach, teaches 4WD owners how to confidently and safely use their vehicles to the fullest extent in difficult terrain and adverse driving conditions. Visit www.4x4training.com to develop or improve your driving skill.

Copyright 2016, Badlands Off-Road Adventures, Inc.

BRC QUESTIONS OHV RESTRICTIONS IN BI-STATE SAGE GROUSE DECISION

4x4 Wire - Tue, 05/31/2016 - 20:23

BOISE, ID (May 31) -- Sharetrails.org/BlueRibbon Coalition (BRC), a national trail-based recreation group, today slammed recent decisions that would severely restrict off-highway vehicle (OHV) events and trail improvements in many areas in eastern California and Nevada.  The changes, in the name of sage grouse management, were demanded by a handful of preservationist special interest groups.

Categories: Legislation

Prevention of human caused fires urged

4x4 Wire - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 10:33

With Memorial Day weekend upon us and the season for more outings on public lands, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Western Nevada Agency, would like to remind the community to be aware of the increased chance of wildfire due to drying conditions and increased fuels from the wet spring. 

Categories: Legislation

BLM Releases Solar Energy Monitoring Strategy

MuirNet - Thu, 05/26/2016 - 12:43

The Bureau of Land Management released today the final strategy for monitoring the impacts of solar energy development in eastern Riverside County. Public comments from the October draft strategy were considered into this final strategy which is part of the implementation of the Western Solar Plan.

The Riverside East Long Term Monitoring Strategy will help the BLM understand solar energy development's broad-scale effects on resources such as vegetation, hydrology, and air quality. The information generated through the strategy will help the BLM permit future solar energy projects.

Read More ...

Categories: Legislation

Cherry-Picked Science and Non-Transparent Tactics used to Justify Overreaching Agenda

MuirNet - Mon, 05/23/2016 - 10:10
Panel: Obama Administration Relies on Cherry-Picked Science and Non-Transparent Tactics to Justify Overreaching Agenda

Washington, D.C. -- Today (May 19, 2016), the Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources held an oversight hearing to examine deficiencies in regulatory transparency at the Department of the Interior (DOI).

Transparency is the cornerstone of a participatory democracy, but there are glaring failures from the increasing use of executive orders and questionable science from the self-proclaimed “most transparent Administration.” Regulations have insufficient public comment periods, lack independently verifiable supporting data and the cumulative impacts are never assessed.  Time after time, access to supporting scientific studies and agency data are unavailable to the public.

Read More ...

Categories: Legislation

Forest Service and Partners Gear Up for Significant 2016 Wildfire Season

MuirNet - Tue, 05/17/2016 - 16:12
Current Outlook Underscores Need to Reform Wildfire Funding

WASHINGTON, May 17, 2016 – Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell met today with Forest Service Regional Foresters to discuss preparations for anticipated significant wildland fire potential in 2016. The briefing comes as the 2016 fire season has begun with five times more acres already burned than this time last year, following 2015's record-setting fire season.

"The 2016 wildfire season is off to a worrisome start. Southern California, the Great Basin in Nevada, portions of the southwest, and even Florida and Hawaii are particularly vulnerable this year. In California, more than 40 million trees have died, becoming dry fuel for wildfire," said Vilsack. "Congress must take action now to ensure that we, and, ultimately the firefighters we ask so much of, have the resources to do the restoration and wildfire prevention work necessary to keep our forests healthy."

Read More ...

Categories: Legislation

Safe Departure Point and Other End Trip Stuff

4x4 Wire - Mon, 05/16/2016 - 11:56

Last month we reviewed the 10 qualities of a great trail leader. That article took us from the planning and preparations stages to the conclusion of a 4WD trip. This month’s article discusses what you as a Trail Leader need to do once everyone has reached the departure point. Even though the ride is over, several additional steps are needed to bring that enjoyable event to a successful conclusion. This is riveting information if you are a trail guide!

Categories: Legislation

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